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Ever wondered if your credit score is above or below average in relation to others in your age range and location? Read on to find out.

A drawn map of the United States with each state labeled.

A credit score is a number ranging from 300-850 that measures your creditworthiness—the higher the score, the better. There are several types of credit scores as well as several components that go into one.

Experian recently explored the average credit scores in the United States, breaking them down by several different factors in an effort to understand how and why they continue to increase. Two factors they explored are age and state. And, while these do not affect how a credit score is determined, there are some correlations one can draw.

What is the average credit score by age?

Age is not factored when calculating your credit score—in fact, it doesn’t even show up in your credit report. What matters is the average length of your credit history—the longer your available credit history is, assuming it’s a responsible one, the more likely lenders are to view you as financially trustworthy over the long term.

So, while it’s entirely possible for a young person to have a higher credit score than someone older than them, the odds are they will have a lower score simply because they have shorter payment and credit histories than their older counterparts.

This is evident in the current average FICO® credit scores by age range:

Age Range

Average FICO® Credit Score

18-24

679

25-40

686

41-56

705

57-75

740

76+

760

†Data from Experian

What is the average credit score by state?

No matter the neighborhood, town, city, or state, credit scores range from person to person based on each individual’s financial situation—and NOT the location itself. Where you live is never considered when calculating your credit score.

Where there is a potential impact is with the different societal characteristics present in each state. Things like unemployment rates and income levels can potentially influence credit scores one way or another. For example, a state with higher employment and income levels may lead to its residents having a better ability to pay their credit card bills, get more credit, etc., and vice versa with states with lower employment and income levels.

With all of that in mind, you can see the different average FICO® credit scores from state to state:

State

Average FICO® Credit Score

Alabama

691

Alaska

717

Arizona

710

Arkansas

694

California

721

Colorado

728

Connecticut

728

Delaware

714

District of Columbia

717

Florida

706

Georgia

693

Hawaii

732

Idaho

725

Illinois

719

Indiana

712

Iowa

729

Kansas

721

Kentucky

702

Louisiana

689

Maine

727

Maryland

716

Massachusetts

732

Michigan

719

Minnesota

742

Mississippi

681

Missouri

711

Montana

730

Nebraska

731

Nevada

701

New Hampshire

734

New Jersey

725

New Mexico

699

New York

722

North Carolina

707

North Dakota

733

Ohio

715

Oklahoma

692

Oregon

731

Pennsylvania

723

Rhode Island

723

South Carolina

693

South Dakota

733

Tennessee

701

Texas

692

Utah

727

Vermont

736

Virginia

721

Washington

734

West Virginia

699

Wisconsin

735

Wyoming

722

†Data from Experian

So, what does this all mean?

Whether your score looks good or not compared to those around you, it’s always a great idea to do your best to practice smart financial habits (e.g., timely payments, a healthy credit utilization ratio, etc.) The better you do these things, the higher your credit score will likely be.

If you’d like to put these smart financial habits into practice with a new credit card, Credit One Bank offers a variety of cards for you to choose from. You can even take a quiz to find the right card for you.


About the author:

Marc Klein

With his eyes set on becoming the next great ad man (at least until his comedy writing career took off), Marc earned his journalism degree and went straight into advertising for various gaming and tourism clients. He later expanded his credentials to include public affairs and communications work for several environmental science organizations before returning to his marketing roots. A lifelong scholar with recent studies in strategic communication, Marc enjoys tying humor into his writing and simplifying complex financial subjects into engaging and easy-to-digest content for a wide variety of audiences.




This material is for informational purposes only and is not intended to replace the advice of a qualified tax advisor, attorney or financial advisor. Readers should consult with their own tax advisor, attorney or financial advisor with regard to their personal situations.


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